November 28 – 30, 2018
Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Monterrey
Av. Eugenio Garza Sada 2501 Sur
Col. Tecnológico, 64849, Monterrey, México

Welcome to
The International Conference on Nanotechnology
"Tec.Nano 2018"

The accepted papers of Tec.Nano2018 will be available on Materials Today: Proceeding and indexed on the Elsevier system. Register now!

The International Conference on Nanotechnology
"Tec.Nano 2018"
Welcome to

November 28 – 30, 2018
Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Monterrey
Av. Eugenio Garza Sada 2501 Sur
Col. Tecnológico, 64849, Monterrey, México

Welcome to
The International Conference on Nanotechnology
"Tec.Nano 2018"

November 28 – 30, 2018
Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Monterrey
Av. Eugenio Garza Sada 2501 Sur
Col. Tecnológico, 64849, Monterrey, México

Welcome to
The International Conference on Nanotechnology
"Tec.Nano 2018"

November 28 – 30, 2018
Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Monterrey
Av. Eugenio Garza Sada 2501 Sur
Col. Tecnológico, 64849, Monterrey, México

Welcome to
The International Conference on Nanotechnology
"Tec.Nano 2018"

November 28 – 30, 2018
Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Monterrey
Av. Eugenio Garza Sada 2501 Sur
Col. Tecnológico, 64849, Monterrey, México

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Welcome to Tec.Nano 2018 and to
Monterrey, Mexico.

The International Conference on Nanotechnology “Tec.Nano 2018” is a scientific platform that seeks to provide an interaction environment between science, academia, education and industry covering a vast array of NANOTECHNOLOGICAL topics.

This 3-day event to be held at the Monterrey campus of Tecnológico de Monterrey will include conferences, panels, poster sessions and a nanotechnological company fair with world-renown speakers and participants.

Call for Paper Download

The scientific program is centered in 6 main themes:

Advanced and Smart Materials

Chair: Dr. Francisco Servando Aguirre

Main topics: Graphene, 2D-Crystals, Sensors, Large Area Electronics, Renewable Energy Materials, Materials for 3D Printing, Advanced Functional Coatings.

Nanophotonics

Chair: Dr. Israel De León

Main topics: Integrated Photonics, Quantum Optics, Nonlinear Optics, Plasmonics, Metamaterials, Advanced Optical Microscopy, and Integrated Optical Biosensors.

Nanodevices

Chair: Dr. Alan Aguirre Soto

Main topics: Nano(bio)sensors, OLEDs, MEMS and C-MEMS, Nanofabrication, Molecular engineering, Self-assembly, Nanowires, Nanorods, Nanoelectronics, Nanorobots and Drug delivery devices.

Nanobiotechnology and Nanomedicine

Chair: Dr. Gerardo García-Rivas

Main topics: Nanotechnology Approaches to Biology, Nanotherapeutics and Drug Delivery, Nanoprobes in Biological Systems, Nano-based Tissue Engineering, Nanotoxicology, Nanosafety, Biology-Inspired Nanomaterials.

Lab-on-a-Chip

Chair: Dr. Roberto Gallo

Nanomaterials Processing and Characterization

Chair: Dr. Joaquín Oseguera Peña

Main topics: Tribology, Nano-structured Surface Solid Films, Structural Characterization, Mechanical Characterization, Nano-Hardness, Plasma Processes, HiPIMS, PVD, CVD.

Plenary Sessions

Jeff Stansbury

While working as a chemist on polymeric biomaterials at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Jeff Stansbury received his PhD in organic chemistry from the University of Maryland (1988) with thesis work based on single and double ring-opening polymerization using both free radical and cationic pathways. He continued working at NIST until 2000 when he was recruited to the University of Colorado School of Dental Medicine on the Anschutz Medical Campus to develop a biomaterials program that has become well recognized. He now serves as Vice-Chair of the Department of Craniofacial Biology as well as the Senior Associate Dean for Research. When starting at CU, he also established a research group within the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering in Boulder. Stansbury’s research interests are in photopolymerization, polymeric networks and heterogeneous polymers with applications in polymer-based dental materials and other materials uses such as films, coatings, adhesives and 3D printing. He has more than 150 peer-reviewed publications and numerous patents that relate to these topics. Stansbury is a fellow of the Academy of Dental Materials and the American Association for Dental Research.

Pierre Berini

Pierre Berini received his Ph.D. and M.Sc.A. degrees in Electrical Engineering from École Polytechnique de Montréal, and his B.E.Sc. and B.Sc. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, respectively, from the University of Western Ontario. Dr. Berini is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Ottawa and is the Founder and Chief Technology Officer of Spectalis Corp., a venture capital backed company commercializing surface plasmon devices. He is a Canada Foundation for Innovation researcher and has received an URSI Young Scientist Award (1999), a Premier of Ontario Research Excellence Award (2000), the University of Ottawa Young Researcher of the Year Award (2001), and an NSERC E. W. R. Steacie Memorial Fellowship (2008). Dr. Berini is a senior member of the IEEE and a member of the OSA. He is an Associate (Topical) Editor of Optics Express. He is the author or co-author of 17 patents (issued and pending), and of numerous publications in scientific journals and conference proceedings. His broad research interests include optics and photonics, electromagnetics, numerical methods, and the microfabrication of integrated optical structures. His research is currently focused on the area of plasmonics and related device applications including biosensors. Dr. Berini consults for industry, venture capital and grant councils.

Elvin Blanco

Elvin Blanco is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Nanomedicine at the Houston Methodist Research Institute with a secondary appointment in the Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center’s Department of Cardiology. Recently, Dr. Blanco’s laboratory has leveraged several of his nanotechnology platforms towards cardiovascular diseases. Specifically, his work has contributed towards the understanding that remodeled vasculature in conditions such as heart failure and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) enables successful translation of nanotherapeutic strategies for drug delivery. Dr. Blanco’s current research interests include: 1) nanoparticle-based gene and drug delivery for the treatment of heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias, as well as chronic lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and PAH; and 2) metabolic reprogramming as a therapeutic strategy in diseases such as heart failure and PAH. Throughout his career, Dr. Blanco has authored more than 43 peer-reviewed articles and is an inventor on 2 patents. His research has received support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Department of Defense (DoD), the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, and the George and Angelina Kostas Research Center for Cardiovascular Nanomedicine.

Joel Voldman, Ph. D.

Joel Voldman, Ph. D., is an Assoociate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA. Prof. Voldman received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering summa cum laude from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, in 1995. He received the Masters degree in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, in 1997 and his Ph.D. from MIT in 2001. Following this, he performed postdoctoral training in George Church's lab at Harvard Medical School. He has been on the MIT faculty since July 2002. In 2004, he was awarded the NBX Career Development Chair, and in 2006 he was promoted to associate professor. He is the leader of the RLE Biological Microtechnology and BioMEMS Group that performs research on microfluidics applied to cell biology, neuroscience, and medicine.

H. Kumar Wickramasinghe

H. Kumar Wickramasinghe, is the Nicolaos G and Sue Curtis Alexopoulos Presidential Chair and The Henry Samueli Endowed Chair Professor, University of California, Irvine. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and respected pioneer in Nanotechnology. Prof. Wickramasinghe received a Ph.D. from the University of London in Electrical Engineering in 1974, and a B.Sc. from the same institution in 1970. Following a post-doctoral appointment at Stanford University, he joined the faculty in the Electrical Engineering Department at University Colege London in 1978. In 1984, Wickramasinghe moved to the IBM Research at the T. J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, N.Y. where he was manager of physical measurements and chief scientist, manufacturing research. He led the team that developed atomic force microscopes (AFMs) into fully hardened instruments that are used both within IBM and world-wide. Holding over 100 patents, some of his most significant inventions and contributions to the nano field include the development of the vibrating mode atomic force microscope (AFM), the magnetic force microscope, the electrostatic force microscope, the Kelvin probe force microscope, the scanning thermal microscope, and the apertureless near-field optical microscope. These scanning probe microscopes are the eyes used to see and measure the nanotechnology products being developed around the world.

Official Sponsors